2017/02/26

BOOK HAUL:
FEBRUARY

February is at an end and it's time to show you some books!

This month has been pretty good. I've been on vacation for a week, which was great, and other than that, life has passed in pleasant monotony. It's snowed quite a lot here in Norway and although that's nice, I am looking more and more forward to spring. The lengthening of daylight during the days helps a lot and it does get brighter and brighter every day!

I've also been getting more and more into reading after having a period of time without much time and headspace to read, so that's been pretty great. And I've gotten loads of cool new books, which is of course what you want to see!



















I hope you've all had a great day and a lovely month!
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2017/02/25

BOOK REVIEW:
ARE PRISONS OBSOLETE? BY ANGELA Y. DAVIS

Title: Are Prisons Obsolete?
Author: Angela Y. Davis
Published: 2003
Language: English
Pages: 128
Rating: 4/5


Summary:
This book discusses the abolishment of the prison system as it is in America today and how the time for the prison is nearing an end.


Review:
This was quite an interesting book.

Davis is a massively intelligent women and when one knows who she is and a bit about her life, it makes her thoughts on this matter all the more interesting. I especially enjoyed the parts that dealt with race and gender. The book is very well written, eloquent and powerful.

I can't help but compare this book to The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander, which I read a while back, as that book is basically an expanded version of this. I feel like this serves as a good introduction to the thought of abolishing the prison system in America, but for me, who has read quite a lot about this, it wasn't anything new.

New to me or not, this was well worth the read and I think it's a great book. If you're new to this topic, I would especially recommend it, but if not, it's still worth checking out.
You can get this book at The Book Depository*
You can read more about it on Goodreads
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2017/02/24

2017/02/23

2017/02/22

BOOK REVIEW:
THE FISHERMEN BY CHIGOZIE OBIOMA

Title: The Fishermen
Author: Chigozie Obioma
Published: 2015
Language: English
Pages: 304
Rating: 3/5


Summary:
Set in Nigeria in the 1990's, this is about four brothers who encounter a madman whose prophecy changes their lives forever.


Review:
I bought this book a while back, when I saw it was on the shortlist for the Man Booker prize a couple of years ago. And although I definitely enjoyed this, I think perhaps my expectations were a wee bit high.

The writing in this is quite good and there are some really beautiful parts in here. The story is compelling and fascinating, as well as the culture and family structure described. The characters were especially wonderful though - reading about the four brothers was absolutely captivating.

I think the first part of the book did drag on a bit, and sometimes I felt like the writing got a bit carried away with its metaphors. I can't quite put my finger on what it is, but something about this made me slightly wary. Maybe it was because my expectations were so high.

The fact that this book is the authors debut novel is quite impressive though, and I will definitely be checking out more of his work in the future. It's definitely worth checking out.

You can get this book at The Book Depository*
You can read more about it on Goodreads
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2017/02/21

BOOKSTAGRAM SPOTLIGHT: @THELITTLEBOOKSHELF

Time to show you another bookstagrammer who often brightens up my feed! This time it's @thelittlebookshelf!



Et bilde publisert av @thelittlebookshelf

Go follow!
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2017/02/20

BOOK REVIEW:
SCARS ACROSS HUMANITY BY ELAINE STORKEY

Title: Scars Across Humanity: Understanding and Overcoming Violence Against Women
Author: Elaine Storkey
Published: 2015
Language: English
Pages: 276
Rating: 3/5


Summary:
In a mix between research and personal testimonies, this book explores different forms of violence against women across the globe.


Review:
This was definitely an interesting read.

It's a rather uncomfortable read, as it should be. I think a lot of people already know parts or all of what is offered in this book, but it's quite horrifying to see it all together and for that, it gave me something new. The book offers both facts and fascinating discussions around those facts, as well as heartbreaking testimonies from real people around the world.

It is, however, not without it's flaws, and there are two things I find could've been better. The first thing is that I felt the testimonies of the women around the world (which the author has spoken to on her travels) were not given enough room. Often there was just a small quote and a very short biography, and it left them a bit faceless. The second thing is the conclusion; I found it too short and sort of unhelpful, as the author chose to focus on her own faith as part of the answer, which as a non-Christian, I found a bit narrow and restrictive (that only came up in that chaper though and was luckily left out of the rest of the book).

It is an important book and showcases crucial facts about violence against women in many forms, and for that, it is worth the read and I would recommend it.

You can get this book at The Book Depository*
You can read more about it on Goodreads
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2017/02/18

TRAVEL:
BOOKS I'M BRINGING WITH ME ON WINTER HOLIDAY

Fortunate as I am, I'm going on holiday for a week, and I thought I would show you some stuff I'm bringing with me!


Hope you're all having a great weekend!
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2017/02/17

2017/02/15

BOOK REVIEW:
THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET BY SANDRA CISNEROS

Title: The House on Mango Street
Author: Sandra Cisneros
Published: 1984
Language: English
Pages: 110
Rating: 4/5


Summary:
Told in a series of short stories, this is the story of Esperanza, a young Latino girl growing up in Chicago.


Review:
I greatly enjoyed reading this book. I'm aware this is taught in schools, but I'd never heard of this before. I wish they'd taught it in my school though, as I think it's a fantastic little book.

I absolutely loved reading about the characters and Mango street. You slowly, but surely, get to know the different people living there and how they appear through the eyes of a young girl. The whole book is rich in culture and life.

The writing is lovely. It's poignant and lyrical. The stories are very short, but there's nothing missing. To be able to craft such a full and vivid story in so few pages is quite a feat, but the author does it effortlessly.

It's a simple but beautiful novel and it's one I think will stick with me for quite some time. I would highly recommend it.
You can get this book at The Book Depository*
You can read more about it on Goodreads
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2017/02/13

BOOK REVIEW:
PENGUIN MODERN POETS 2

Title: Penguin Modern Poets 2: Controlled Explosions
Authors: Michael Robbins, Patricia Lockwood, Timothy Thornton
Published: 2016
Language: English
Pages: 128
Rating: 2/5


Summary:
This is a collection of poetry featuring modern poems from three different authors.


Review:
To be completely honest, I don't have that much to say about this.

Most of the poetry in here was quite all right, but not really my personal preference. The collection does feel a bit more cohesive than the first in this series, but overall none of the poetry was really my cup of tea. There are a few poems in it I've marked and will read again, but overall, I was not overwhelmed.

I'd recommend giving it a go if you want to check out one of the authors, but other than that, I don't have much else to say. It is always interesting to give new poets a go, so I am glad I read it.
You can get this book at The Book Depository*
You can read more about it on Goodreads
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2017/02/11

2017/02/10

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